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Old TV magazines and publications

..... but first key television transmission dates.

See the key events from 1873 onwards and leading up to 1924 in the March 1928 issue of "Television" magazine.

1924 John Logie Baird, the inventor of the mechanical television transmits a flickering image across a few feet.
He demonstrated to the "Radio Times" transmissions of moving silhouette images in his London laboratory.

1925 Baird created the first televised pictures. A human face (William Taynton) with tonal quality.
In March 1925, John Logie Baird set up and demonstrated his mechanical television system in a 3-week
demonstration at the Selfridges department store in London. About 1000 people saw the demonstration.

1926 John Logie Baird demonstrates his television system to members of the Royal Institution and 50 scientists
in his London attic laboratory. This was reported in "The Times" and other newspapers.

Note - In 2009 our museum was contacted by Iain Logie Baird, the grandson of John Logie Baird.
Iain was the curator of the National Media Museum (UK) and he requested the loan of a number of vintage satellite
receivers from our museum for an 1-year exhibition. The receivers were provided for the duration of the exhibition


1927 Baird demonstrates "long distance transmission of television pictures" using telephone lines (438 miles) between
London to Glasgow. Was this the first ever cable system? Could this be described as a form of steaming?

1927 Philo Taylor Farnsworth demonstrates the first electronic television system. It was demonstrated in San Francisco
on 7th Sept 1927 and for the first time it employed electronic scanning in both the pickup and display devices.
RCA later filed an interference suit against Farnsworth, claiming Vladimir Zworykin's patent had priority over
Farnsworth's design, but they presented no evidence that Zworykin had actually produced a functioning
transmitter tube before 1931. The U.S. Patent Office made a decision in 1934 in favour of Farnsworth

Note - See our article from the Oct 1934 issue of "Short Wave and Television" magazine by Philo T Farnsworth below.

1928 Successful demonstration of television which was received in Hartsdale, New York and broadcast
on short wave from Coulsdon by John Logie Baird on the 8th February 1928.

1928 Baird demonstrates the world's first colour television transmission on 3rd July 1928.

Note - See the Peto-Scott advert "buying parts to build a Baird Televisor" in the March 1928 issue of "Television".

1929 Baird uses the BBC’s London transmitter to broadcast television. He sells ‘Televisor’ sets with
30 lines of resolution. They were manufactured by "Plessey" in England and about 1000 were sold.

1930 Sound-and-vision 30-line television is transmitted

1932 The BBC takes over programme-making for the 30-line television service.

Note - See the article on "Television Progress" from the Nov. 1933 issue of "Popular Wireless" magazine below.

1934 The Marconi-EMI electronic television system was developed in 1934 by the EMI Research Team led by Isaac Shoenberg.
It would become part of the first ever "high-definition" broadcast. Marconi-EM demonstrates a practical working
fully-electronic camera system to BBC and Post Office personnel BBC high definition broadcasts were planned for 1936

1935 The "Television Advisory Committee" considers the merits of the "high-definition" 240 lines or greater
television systems. The Baird 240-line mechanical system and the Marconi-EMI 405-line electronic system are to be
developed for transmission and evaluation from the London television station. Alexandra Palace is selected as the
site for the London Station with studios and a transmitter tower for the new BBC television service

1936 In June 1936 the BBC begins regular "high-definition" television broadcasts / programmes from
the "Alexandra Palace" transmitter to the London area in the United Kingdom. The BBC was and still is a public
service and is free from advertising. The Baird and Marconi-EMI systems are transmitted on alternate weeks.
The BBC claims this to be a "world first". This is partly due to the fact the standard for "high-definition"
broadcasts was a minimum of 240 lines and earlier transmissions (e.g. in Germany) did not reach that standard.
Marconi-EMI's all-electronic television system, worked on 405 lines and Baird's system worked on 240 lines.

1937 The Baird system is abandoned on the advice of the Television Advisory Committee and the Marconi-EMI
405 line "high definition" VHF system is adopted. Whilst this might seem like an obvious decision now, each
system had it's own set of problems, both systems at this time produced pictures of similar poor quality
and both systems were equally unreliable.

1939 EMI make the first 405-line tele-recording. A Mechau projector is used in reverse.

1939 Television in the UK is suspended due to the Second World War.

1946 BBC Television starts post war transmissions

1949 The second transmitter opens in the Midlands (December 1949). There were very few pre-1950s UK television
sets manufactured as transmissions were only in the south of the UK before 1950.

1952 By August 1952 the BBC claimed "nationwide coverage". Transmissions reached 75% of the population.

1953 Colour transmissions start in the US using the 525 lines NTSC system.

1964 625 line transmissions on the UHF band start in the UK. Transmissions are now in 405 lines VHF and 625 lines UHF.
Dual standard TVs are now sold.

1967 Regular colour transmissions start in the UK using the PAL system. Although colour TV comes to the UK some 14
years after it was introduced in the US, the PAL system was superior to the NTSC system particularly in colour stability.

1973 405 line VHF transmissions end in the UK. Only 625 line capable TV sets can now receive TV broadcasts in the UK.

1985 The first domestic satellite tv systems for the reception from higher power satellites on smaller
dishes are sold in Europe, the US and the UK.

Note - See our "Satellite Museum" and our "History of Satellite TV".

1998 Digital terrestrial TV transmissions start.

2005 DVB-S2 including high definition broadcasts from satellite were ratified by ETSI.

2009 The UK is the first to use the DVB-T2 system including high definition terrestrial broadcasts.
TVs are now fitted with DVB-T2 tuners for DVB-T2 transmissions which include HD at 720p and/or 1020p resolution.

2013 Sky Television delivers the first live 4K UHT broadcast (a football match) via satellite to the UK.
Picture resolution is 3840 x 2160 pixels at 50 frames per second. A Sky Q set top box and a 4K TV is required.



Book of Practical Television 1935.

Book of practical Television 1935. Book of practical Television 1935.

Book of practical Television 1935.

Book of practical Television 1935.



Popular Wireless. Nov. 1933

Popular Wireless. Nov. 1933

This Nov. 1933 issue below of "Popular Wireless" is interesting as it mentions "TELEVISION PROGRESS".
See also below the page it is referring to

TELEVISION PROGRESS. Popular Wireless. Nov. 1933

Then if we look below at the Nov. 1934 issue of Popular Wireless, the title now says
"Popular Wireless AND TELEVISION TIMES"
Clearly the editor and publishers are now taking television much more seriously.

Popular Wireless and Television Times



This Oct. 1937 US publication below of "Short Wave and Television" contains an article about the current
(in 1937) state of television in the US. See also below is the single page article "Television today".

Short Wave and Television. Oct. 1937

Short Wave and Television. Oct. 1937 Telivision Today

In 1927 Philo Taylor Farnsworth demonstrates the first electronic television system. It was demonstrated in San Francisco on
7th Sept 1927 and for the first time it employed electronic scanning in both the pickup and display devices. This interesting
article (above) was written by Philo Taylor Farnsworth 1937. He is the Vice President of Farnsworth Television Corporation



1946. Wireless World. July 1946

Television transmissions were stopped when war broke out in 1939 and resumed on the 7th June 1946.
Here below we have a Wireless world magazines from July 1946 showing a BBC television camera.

Wireless World. July. 1946

Wireless World. September 1948

There is also an excellent picture of a slightly later BBC camera on the front on this magazine.

Wireless World. September 1948



Practical Television magazine. June 1950.

Practical Television magazine. June 1950.

Volume 1. Number 3. Price 9d which was about 4 new pence in the decimal UK currency.
Regular TV broadcasts started in 1936 to the London area but during the war, (1939 - 45) they were
discontinued. In 1946 they restarted and in 1949 the second transmitter was built near Birmingham.
By 1950 there would not have been many TV sets in the country, mainly they would have been located in the London
area receiving TV from Alexandra Palace and with a very small number near Birmingham. Pre-50s televisions are rare.
Some of the features in this June 1950 copy of this magazine were - "Television and the Housewife",
"Scenery for Television" and "Television Puppets".
Editor FJ CAMM. The same editor as Practical Motorist, Practical Mechanics and Practical Householder.

Frederick James Camm was born 6th October 1895 and died on the 18th February 1959.
He was an English technical author and magazine editor for a number of magazines - Practical Engineering -
1st published Jan. 1940, Practical Home Money Maker, Practical Householder, Practical Mechanics -
1st published Oct. 1933 - until Aug. 1963, Practical Motorist - 1st published May 1934, Practical Television -
1st published Sept. 1934 until June 2008, Practical Wireless - 1st published 1932 - still in publication in 2021.

Practical Television magazine. March 1951.

Practical Television magazine. 1951

Practical Television magazine. February 1953.

Practical Television magazine.

Practical Television magazine. June 1957.

Practical Television magazine. June 1957.

Practical Television magazine. February 1958.

Practical Television magazine. February 1958.

This 1958 issue contains an interesting article about the history of television from 1936 to 1958.

Practical Television magazine. Feb 1958. TV History

Practical Television magazine. Feb 1958. TV History

Above and below you can see a reference to - "This Olympia show which opened on August 26th 1936, was the first
opportunity that the public was given to seeing television. The interest shown was unbounded. No fewer than
seven leading radio manufacturers had (TV) receiving sets on show, and the transmissions were seen by 100,000
visitors during the week of the show" - and - "From a purely technical point of view the demonstrations were less
successful as both systems had bad breakdowns." - here the article is referring to broadcasts from
the Baird system and the Marconi-EMI system.

Practical Television magazine. Feb 1958. TV History

Practical Television magazine. Feb 1958. TV History

Practical Television magazine. Feb 1958. TV History

Practical Television magazine. April 1958.

Practical Television magazine. April 1958.

There is a really interesting letter in this April edition of "Practical Television" magazine below.
How things have changed since 1958!

Practical Television magazine. April 1958.

Practical Television magazine. June 1958.

Practical Television magazine. June 1958.

Practical Television magazine. July 1958.

This July 1958 issue of "Practical Television" below shows a very unusual TV from the French company "Teleavia".
The "Teleavia P111" TV was designed by "Flaminio Bertoni".
Flaminio Bertoni was an Italian automobile designer. He designed the Citroën - Traction Avant, 2 CV, DS, H Van and AMI-6
All of these vehicles were designed before this TV in 1958 apart from the AMI-6 which was introduced in 1961.
All of these vehicles had an unusual but now iconic shape compared to other vehicles at the time.

Practical Television magazine. July 1958.

Practical Television magazine. December 1958.

Practical Television magazine.

The front of this Practical Television magazine shows a TV which looks very similar (but not identical) to the
Ekcovision Model T164 television which we have in the museum Also notice the excellent front cover graphics
which, in my opinion were better than previous front covers above and better than latter front covers below.
Again FJ Camm was the editor. Probably one his last magazines as he died in 1959.
There is some interesting advertising from this magazine below.

Practical Television magazine.

Practical Television magazine.

Practical Television magazine.

Practical Television magazine.

Practical Television magazine. December 1964.

Practical Television magazine.

Practical Television magazine. January 1965.

Practical Television magazine.

These days remote controls for televisions are the norm, but not in January 1965.
Here you can build your own remote control. Notice how large it is and with knobs on!

Practical Television magazine. February 1965.

Practical Television magazine.

Practical Television magazine. February 1967.

Practical Television magazine.

This is a very interesting Practical Television magazine as it includes a feature on "Getting TV Taped".
You can see on the front cover a Philips EL3400 and also what looks like an Ampex reel to reel similar to the VR5003.

Practical Television magazine, video recording.

Practical Television magazine, video recording

Practical Television magazine, video recording

Practical Television magazine. September 1967.

Practical Television magazine.

An excellent picture on the front of production facilities and studio cameras in 1967.
The camera has "Rediffusion" on the side which was the main cable provider in the UK. In those
days only terrestrial content was found on cable as this is 20 years before satellite TV.

Practical Television magazine. February 1969.

Practical Television magazine.

This one is of particular interest to me as I bought it in 1969 and kept it (not a donation).



Long Distance Television by Roger Bunney. June 1976.

Roger Bunney wrote this book in 1976 and another "A TV-DXers Handbook" (below) in 1986. He was a writer for "Television"
magazine (formally "Practical Television") from 1970 until 2007 when it folded. See more information about Roger below.

Long Distance Television by Roger Bunney. Long Distance Television by Roger Bunney.

Long Distance Television by Roger Bunney.

I have known about Roger Bunney for many years. I used to buy "Television" magazine in the 1970s and 80s and would read
his articles. I have been in regular communication with him since 2008. In January 2021 he donated the March 1928 original
copy of "Television" magazine, Vol. 1, No. 1 to the museum. He is a satellite enthusiast and feed hunter. In 1976 he wrote
the book shown above "Long Distance Television". Before satellite TV, large high gain aerials were used to try and receive
a more distant terrestrial transmitter. The BBC and ITV would have local programs and those programs would be different
from one region to another. Being able to receive more than one transmitter provided a wider range of programs. This
was still a very small, even minute selection compared to the 1000s of channels available these days from satellite
or internet sources. Sometimes rotating motors were used to turn the aerial from one transmitter to another. Indeed
I still have an "Hirschmann" aerial rotator which I used in the 1970s. It was not used for TV reception, it was used
to rotate a large FM aerial. In 1986 Roger wrote another book called "A TV-DXers Handbook" about terrestrial
and satellite TV and including satellite feed hunting using a satellite system. Both books are in our museum.

Roger Bunney sent me this email in May 2018.

"I started writing for "Television" magazine (formerly "Practical Television") in June 1971 and continued until 2007 when
the magazine folded. (The regular articles were usually called “Long Distance Television” but there were others. Ed)
I wrote monthly articles called "Satellite Search" in "What Satellite" magazine (which folded in 2014) from 1989 until 2008.
(Note - I also wrote for "What Satellite" magazine from 2008 until 2010. Click here to read the articles. - ED)

I first met Steve Birkill going back to about 1965. He then disappeared from DXTV and surfaced again in 1975 with
dramatic pictures of the ATS-6 [SITE] Indian TV satellite experiment from 35e and although miles off boresight it was
possible to receive signals in the UK. Bob Cooper encouraged to go to the States, and leaving his transmitter job at
Holme Moss. Steve returned to the UK forming a research/development company somewhere in Wales. He did much of the
design for Sky receivers." (I spoke to Steve via “Messenger” in 2018. Details on "The History of Satellite TV" page. Ed)

When I used to read Roger’s articles in "Television" magazine, it was one of his articles in 1987 which led to me
to buy the Sentra STX600 television. Ed). At the time Roger said "Multistandard including all NTSC variants".

Roger Bunney sent me this email in January 2021.

"My doubtful career having left the furniture trade 1960-mid 63 then went to DER TV Rentals at Southampton as a
bench engineer but part way through the 18 month employment period I was transferred to the Salisbury branch in
charge of their Wiltshire/N Dorset service area - I was head of myself in effect - and then in Dec. 1964 started
at Southern Television which became TVS. We all were then made redundant in 1992 when Meridian took the
franchise and stopped making local programmes. I then resurfaced after 6 months of gardening into a
Technician Instructor at Solent University covering radio, film and video production techniques and operation."

During all of that time, Roger was a prolific writer on the subject of television reception.

One of his articles from the September 1982 issue of "Television" magazine is shown below.

Roger Bunney donated this 1928 issue of "Television" magazine Vol. 1 No 1 in January 2021. Click here to read all about it.
We have dedicated a whole page solely to this magazine on our web site. Click here to read all about it.
This issue is the first edition of the world's first dedicated television magazine. March 1928.

Television Magazine 1928, Vol. 1, No 1.



"Television" magazine. October 1975

Vintage

Vintage

Featuring the Philips N1500 video recorder. The first ever domestic video cassette recorder.

"Television" magazine. November 1975

Vintage

Television servicing advice.

"Television" magazine. September 1982

Vintage

Vintage

Vintage

Vintage

Vintage

Vintage

It is quite difficult to find good satellite articles before 1985. The two articles above are from the
Sept 1982 issue of Television magazine. The first article details the situation regarding satellite TV
in 1982. The only satellite directing programming to Europe was the OTS satellite (Orbital Test Satellite)
which was launched in 1978 and stated TV transmissions in Oct 1981. One of two channels was called
"The Satellite Channel" and by Sept 82 it had increased it's transmissions from 2 hours a day to 5
hours a day in August only 4 weeks earlier. A September magazine may well have been written in
early in August before the increase to 5 hours.
The following year the channel was bought by News International and in 1984 it became "The Sky Channel".
In 1982 a 3m dish was required to receive The Satellite Channel from the OTS satellite.
A picture with quite a lot of noise was possible on a 1.8m dish. They refer to a "recognisable picture".
I was surprised to see a 2nd satellite article in this magazine and this time written by Steve Birkill.
Steve is also mentioned in the 1st article above. He suggested a circuit for the "indoor unit" (These days
we might call it a set top box or satellite receiver) in the June 1980 edition of Television magazine.

Below you can see an article written by "Roger Bunney" in this September 1982 issue of "Television" magazine.

Vintage

Vintage

Vintage



Baird Televisor.

Baird Televisor

From 1929 the Baird Televisor was manufactured by "Plessey" in England and about 1000 were sold.
The set uses a 30 line scanning disk. It is about 1m wide and 70cm. The image is about the size of a postage stamp.
The first experimental television broadcasts were just 30 lines of television, received by those who owned a ‘Televisor’.
Many Televisors were DIY and constructed from kits. Some DIY Televisor kits of parts were sold by Peto-Scott Ltd in 1928.

Practical Television magazine 1928 Televisor Kit.



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Vu plus satellite receivers 60cm Clear dish

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Sky Receivers Freesat Receivers All satellite receivers Fixed Dishes Transparent Dishes Motorised systems LNBs
Multiswitches Caravan satellite Satellite finder meters Installation equipment. Catalogue of all satellite products.

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