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Vintage Wireless

Sparton Elftone Envoy International Murphy A484 Cossor CR1200U Bush DAC 30 KB Toaster Model 765B
Sanyo 10x-300 Pye R33 Philips MK 36749 Regentone U22 Pye P92W/U Murphy U698 Philips 790A
Portables - My Lady Margaret, My Baby, Bush BP51 1929 radio adverts Ultra radio adverts Vintage radio publications

1937 Sparton Radio.

1937 Sparton Radio 1937 Sparton Radio

1937 Sparton Radio 1937 Sparton Radio

1937 Sparton Radio 1937 Sparton Radio

1937 Sparton Radio 1937 Sparton Radio

This valve (tube) radio was manufactured by Sparton in 1937. Spartaon radios featured very attractive hard wood cabinets.
Sparton Corporation started in 1900 as the "Withington" company in Jackson, Michigan, by Philip and Winthrop Withington.
The company manufactured parts for agriculture but soon moved into the manufacture of steel parts for the new motor
industry. By 1909 it was manufacturing car radiator fan parts and a couple of years later an electric car horn.
Just after the 1st World War it moved into the production of early battery powered radios with the trade name "Sparton".
Sparton continued to make radios and early televisions until 1956 when Sparton became part of "Magnavox".



Elftone Envoy transistor radio.

Transistor radio Transistor radio Transistor radio

This is an early Japanese transistor radio. Owned from new. Inside the large case is a small
radio PCB. Mostly the case contains empty space. LW/MW Battery Mains. Purchaced in the 1970s.
Always kept the box for everything!



International Solid State AM Portable Radio.

International Solid State AM Portable Radio. International Solid State AM Portable Radio.

International Solid State AM Portable Radio. International Solid State AM Portable Radio.

This is an early transistor radio which was made in Hong Kong. Owned from new. Purchased it in the 1970s.
It was part of a package of items I purchased at one of those seaside auctions in Blackpool. UK



Unknown Make. Model 765B.

Unknown Make. Model 765B Unknown Make. Model 765B

Unknown Make. Model 765B Unknown Make. Model 765B

Unknown Make. Model 765B

Unknown Manufacturer. Model No. 765B. This looks similar to models in the mid 1940s. British made.
Large attractive wooden case desktop model. Long wave, medium wave and short wave.
If anyone recognises this radio, and knows the make, please contact us with details.



1946. Regentone U22.

Regentone U22 Regentone U22

Regentone U22 Regentone U22

Regentone U22

Manufactured by Regentone Products Ltd in 1946. Long wave, medium wave and short wave radio.
Desktop model in attractive wooden case. 5 valves.
Made in Romford, Essex, England. Company founded in 1923.



1958. Murphy radio A484.

Murphy radio A484

Murphy radio A484 Murphy radio A484

Manufactured by Murphy Radio Ltd. Welwin Garden City UK. Contains 8 valves. Super Heterodyne, long wave,
short wave and FM, 2 loudspeakers. Table-top model. Fully working. bOriginal Price in 1958 £39.00



1960/61. Sanyo 10X-300 transistor radio.

Sanyo 10X-300 transistor radio. Sanyo 10X-300 transistor radio.

Sanyo 10X-300 transistor radio. Sanyo 10X-300 transistor radio.

Sanyo 10X-300 transistor radio.

This is a very rare radio and is one of the most interesting in the collection. 240V and internal battery.
Made by Sanyo in Japan and yet it looks very like the Murphy (Made in England) valve model from 1958 above.
It has the same styling, it is in a similar wooden case (late 50s styling) and it has push button selection keys.
Sanyo started making radios in 1954. The first ever reported transistor model from Sanyo is the 8s-p3 in 1959
containing 8 transistors and in the usual Japanese style plastic portable case. There may have been others
but our research only finds this 8 transistor model. The Sanyo 10s-p10 1 from 1961 is a 10 transistor
portable plastic radio. The notation 10s-p10 relates to 10 transistors just as the 1959 model 8s-p3 had 8.
There was an after-market servicing handbook for the plastic portable 10s-p10 radio dated 1962. This
is likely to have been published a little time after that model was released. This museum desktop model 10X-300
also has 10 transistors. It seems very likely these 10 transistor models would have been manufactured 1960/61.
There is nothing on the internet which details an early 10 transistor Sanyo radio from 1960/61 in a wooden
desktop cabinet rather than plastic portable model. This may be the only one. Indeed looking at this radio,
it looks like a late 1950s valve radio (like the 1958 Murphy) in size and styling, until you pick it up and
realise how light it is. "HiFi" - "2 speaker model". To summarise - This radio is unusual because -
It looks like a valve radio but is transistorised. Built right on the transition years when valves gave way
to transistors. About the same size as a valve radio (like the Murphy) but much lighter.
Japanese radios were usually plastic portables. This is a very rare wooden desktop model. It is a very early
transistor radio. There is no information about it. It could be the only one remaining. Very rare.
In our searches for “early Japanese transistor radios” we only found one desktop model in a dark stained
wooden case made by “Crown”. It contained 8 transistors and had 4 control knobs. Most Japanese transistor
radios were plastic portables. This radio was purchased from a dealer in the UK. The last picture from
the back (very difficult to read) has been enhanced so that the text can be read more easily.



1959. Pye R33 valve radio. Plastic case.

Pye R33 transistor radio. Pye R33 transistor radio.

Like the Philips MK 36749 valve radio below, this radio was in a plastic case and was compact. It was lighter than many
valve radios at the time which were in wooden cases. This is not a battery portable as it is powered by mains electricity
and not batteries. 1959 was the time when smaller much lighter battery portable radios were being produced in Japan
and sold worldwide. This valve radio was soon to be considered obsolete technology.



Philips MK 36749 valve radio. Plastic case.

Philips MK 36749 valve radio. Philips MK 36749 valve radio.

It is likely this Philips radio was produced in 1958 / 59 as it is similar to other radios of that period
including the Pye R33 above and the Philips B2G81U from 1959

Like the Pye R33 valve radio above, this radio was in a plastic case and was compact. It was lighter than many
valve radios at the time which were in wooden cases. This is not a battery portable as it is powered by mains
electricity and not batteries. 1959 was the time when smaller much lighter battery portable radios were being
produced in Japan and sold worldwide. This valve radio was soon to be considered obsolete technology.



1954. Pye P93W/U valve radio.

Pye P93W/U valve radio. Pye P93W/U valve radio.

Pye P93W/U valve radio. Pye P93W/U valve radio.

Pye P93W/U valve radio. Pye P93W/U valve radio.

Manufactured by Pye Ltd of Cambridge England. Table model in light and dark Walnut veneers.
9 wavebands including long wave, medium wave and short wave. 5 valves.



1958. Murphy U698.

Murphy U698 valve radio. Murphy U698 valve radio.

Murphy U698 valve radio. Murphy U698 valve radio.

Manufactured by Murphy Radio Ltd.; Welwyn Garden City England. Medium wave and long wave.
4 valves. Attractive plastic desktop model.



1959 Cossor CR1200U valve radio.

Murphy radio A484 Murphy radio A484

Murphy radio A484 Murphy radio A484

A.C. Cossor Ltd. was a British company founded in 1859. The company's products included radios, televisions,
valves and military electronic devices. This radio had 4 valves. Medium wave and long wave desktop model.



1946. The Bakelite Bush DAC90 valve radio.

Bush DAC 30 radio

Released July 1946. LW and MW wavebands. 5 Valves. Original cost £11 11s (about £11.55).



1950. The Bakelite KB Toaster valve radio

KB Toaster radio

Looked like a toaser. KB Toaster radio. Released 1950. 5 valves. LW and MW wavebands.



"Ultra" radio leaflet. 1939

Old Ultra radio leaflet.

Old Ultra radio leaflet.

Old Ultra radio leaflet.

Publication date not on brochure but the radios in the brochure are from 1939.



Practical Wireless magazine. August 1969.

Practical Wireless August 1969

Featuring a 3 band portable radio.



Adverts from the BBC Hand Book 1929.

BBC Hand Book 1929. BBC Hand Book 1929.

From the BBC Hand Book 1929. There was no television in 1929 and the even the number of radio stations was limited.
One company quotes "Why we guarantee 20 stations"



Practical Wireless magazine. May 1962.

Practical Wireless May 1962

This is an interesting front cover. 1962 was a year when transistor radios were starting to
become more popular but valve radios were still available. Here we see projects for both.



1936 Philips Model 790A Console Radio.

1936 Philips Model 790A Radio Console. 1936 Philips Model 790A Radio Console.

1936 Philips Model 790A Radio Console. 1936 Philips Model 790A Radio Console.

1936 Philips Model 790A Radio Console. 1936 Philips Model 790A Radio Console.

1936 Philips Model 790A Radio Console. 1936 Philips Model 790A Radio Console.

1936 Philips Model 790A Radio Console. 1936 Philips Model 790A Radio Console.

1936 Philips Model 790A Radio Console. 1936 Philips Model 790A Radio Console.

1936 Philips Model 790A Radio Console.

This pre-war 1936 Philips model 790A console radio is a valued exhibit in our museum. A really beautiful wooden
cabinet. The radio is rare but the console version is even more rare. A desktop version was also available.
The "Bakelite" radio controls under the lid hinge forwards for use. You could imagine this radio being used
during the second world war to listen to the BBC war news or maybe even "Lord Haw Haw" from Germany.
5 valves, Long, medium and short wave. Manufactured by Philips Lamps Ltd, London. Serial number 2587.



Three battery portable valve radios from the 1950s.

Three portable valve radios.

1954. Vidor "My Lady Margaret De Luxe" portable valve radio.

Vidor My Lady Margaret valve radio. Vidor My Lady Margaret valve radio.

Vidor My Lady Margaret valve radio. Vidor My Lady Margaret valve radio.

4 valves, medium wave and long wave. Covered wooden case. 8" x 8" battery portable. 2.24Kg excluding battery.
Manufactured by Vidor Ltd. Erith, Kent U.K.

1956. Ever Ready - "My Baby" portable valve radio.

Ever Ready My Baby radio. Ever Ready My Baby radio.

Ever Ready My Baby radio. Ever Ready My Baby radio.

4 valves, medium wave and long wave. Covered wooden case. 9" x 9.5" battery portable. 1.97Kg excluding battery.
Manufactured by Ever Ready Co Ltd. London. U.K.

1957. Bush BP51 portable valve radio.

Bush BP51 portable valve radio. Bush BP51 portable valve radio.

Bush BP51 portable valve radio. Bush BP51 portable valve radio.

4 valves, medium wave and long wave. Covered wooden case. 9" x 9.5" battery portable. 2.06Kg excluding battery.
Manufactured by Bush Radio. London. U.K.

These three Mid 50s portable valve radios are all very similar. This was the last attempt ("last throw of the dice")
to produce a lightweight battery portable radio using valve technology. By 1959/60 plastic portable radios from
Japan took over. Desktop valve radios continued into the early 60s but not as battery portables. All three radios
have a similar style and are representative of the era and the available technology at that time.
All three radios are about the same weight at about 2Kg, the Vidor is physically smaller than the other two.
By 1959 plastic case transistor battery portable radios were a little under 1Kg.
In addition, transistor radios used much lighter, smaller batteries which lasted longer.
By 1959 plastic case transistor battery portable radios were a little under 1Kg.
In addition, transisor radios used lighter, smaller batteries which lasted much longer. Since valves
heat up they draw a lot of current and drain batteries much faster than "solid state" transistor radios.



Additional notes -

Short wave 10m - 100m
Medium wave 100m - 1000m
Long wave 1000m and upwards




We also have in the museum -

A PYE Radio Model P224



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Vu plus satellite receivers 60cm Clear dish

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