Museum of early consumer electronics and 1st achievements
www.rewindmuseum.com

  Reel to reel B&W video
    Reel to reel colour video  
    Ampex  
    1st Umatic  
    Philips n1500 n1700 v2000  
    1st VHS VCRs  
  1st Betamax VCRs  
    1st compact video cassette  
    8mm  
    Old video cameras
    1st camcorders
    1st laser disc player
  Vintage satellite (receivers with knobs on!)
    Old televisions
    1st home computers
    Gaming
    Vintage electronic devices
    Gramophones    
    Turntables & tone arms  
    Valve (tube) amplifiers  
    Reel to reel audio  
    1st audio cassette recorders
  Home  
    Radios  
  1st brick cell phones  
  Antique telephones  
  Old toys  
  Old books magazines adverts brochures  
    FAQs  
    Milestone product history with dates      
        Museum exhibits on tour        
      Links to useful similar sites      
      Contact us    
Vintage video cameras.

Sony CVC-2000 Ampex CC-452 Shibaden HV-40SK Sony DVC-2400 Shibaden FP-707 Akai VC-1A Akai VC-100
Sony AVC-3200 Sony AVC-3420 Philips V100 Sony DXC-1600 Sony DXC-1200 Panasonic WV-3085
JVC GC-4800U Sony AVC-3450 Sony HVC-2000P Hitachi FP-10 Hitachi VK-C800E JVC GX-78E JVC KY1900E
Panasonic F10 Panasonic F15 JVC KY-19 Pictures of BBC cameras from 1946 and 1948

Sony DXC 1200

With a name like "Rewind Museum", the history of video recording and early video cameras is very important part of the museum.



1965. The Sony CVC-2000. 1st domestic video camera

Sony CVC-2000 camera Sony CVC-2000 camera

Sony CVC-2000 camera Sony CVC-2000 camera

Sony CVC-2000 camera Sony CVC-2000 camera Sony CVC-2000 camera

1965. VCC-2000 camera kit and monitor.

Sony CVC-2000 camera

The Sony VCC-2000 camera kit The Sony VCC-2000 camera kit

This was the first ever domestic video camera and it partnered the first ever domestic video tape recorder
(reel to reel), the CV-2000. It is therefore a very important museum exhibit. There is no viewfinder, no
mini CRT monitor, not even an optical viewfinder. There is, however, a couple of wire squares that have to
be lined up rather like cross wires. In the satellite industry, not using a proper meter for location, just
using a compass or the sun, shadows and time of day is often called "direct reckoning". If we were to call
these sights, "pointing by direct reckoning", we would not be far wrong! It is likely that the "parallax
errors" with this type of picture framing would be quite high but may be reduced with plenty of practice.
In the pictures above you can see a cvc-2000 camera, which is part of the complete vcc-2000 camera kit
and includes extra lenses and connection leads and in a carry case. Also shown is the VTR and TV. Of all
of the cameras in the museum, this one and the Ampex CC-452, also for 1965 are the most
important as far as their place in the history of video recording is concerned.



1965. The Ampex CC-452 studio TV camera.

The Ampex CC-452 TV camera. The Ampex CC-452 TV camera.

The Ampex CC-452 TV camera. The Ampex CC-452 TV camera.

The Ampex CC-452 TV camera. The Ampex CC-452 TV camera.

This camera has been in the museum since 2006. It is probably one of the two most important cameras in the museum.
This camera and the Sony CVC-2000 above are very valued exhibits due to their historic place in video history. It is
very similar and only two years after the camera packaged with the Ampex Signature V system which was the worlds
first domestic video recording system. This studio camera was introduced 2 years later. Until 1965, video recorders
used heavy 2-inch video tape but here Ampex introduced the first 1-inch tape recorder, the Ampex VR 5005 which is
also in the museum. Indeed it is highly likely this camera would have been used with the Ampex VR 5005 recorder.
These were professional products but the same year (1965) Sony introduced the first 1/2-inch domestic video recorder,
the Sony 2000D and that was used with the CVC-2000 camera above. Ampex was founded in 1944 and incorporated
in Califirnia in 1946. In 1956 they introduce their first reel to reel video tape recorder - the VR 1000. This was a
quadruplex VTR. It was the worlds first production video tape recorder. Ampex are still in business today (2018).



1967. The Sony DVC-2400 (Rover) camera.

The Sony dv2400 camera. The Sony dv2400 camera.

The Sony dv2400 camera. The Sony dv2400 camera.

Sony DV-2400 Video Rover with camera Sony DV-2400 library picture

The Sony DVC-2400 vidicon camera was part of the very first domestic portable reel to reel video kit. The CV-2400
"Video Rover" portable video recorder was a record only machine. The lack of a playback facility kept the
size and weight to a minimum. For 1967 this was a really good camera with a very good lens.



1960s. The Shibaden HV-40SK camera

The Shibaden HV-40SK camera The Shibaden HV-40SK camera

The Shibaden HV-40SK camera

The Shibaden HV-50 came out in 1969 and this was an earlier camera. An estimated date of early to mid 1960s
would apply. This is a security camera. This Shibaden product was made by Hitachi Electronics. Made in Japan



1969. The Shibaden FP-707 camera

Shibaden FP-707 camera Shibaden FP-707 camera

Shibaden FP-707 camera Shibaden FP-707 camera

This is quite a rare camera. It uses a single Vidicon tube. It is designed to accompany the Shibaden SV-707 record
only portable VTR. We also have the stand alone CU-707 camera power supply adapter and so the camera can be
used separately from the SV-707 VTR. This is a very well made piece of kit and although the vtr is heavy,
the camera is not and has a good lens. Also a very early piece of kit.



1969. The Akai VC-1A camera

The Akai VC-1A camera Akai VC-1A camera

The Akai VC-1A camera Akai VC-1A camera

Here is a early simple black and white camera. It has a 1" vidicon tube, 50 mm, f 1.8 lens. Controls consist
of a mechanical focus and an on - off switch. It would probably have been used with an Akai X-500 reel to
reel video recorder from the same era.



1970. The Akai VC-100 camera.

Akai VC-100 VTR with camera. Akai VC-100 VTR with camera. Akai VC-100 VTR with camera.

Akai VC-100 VTR with camera. Akai VC-100 VTR with camera.

Akai VC-100 VTR with camera. Akai VC-100 VTR with camera.

This camera is very small for 1970. It is a similar size to a modern camcorder but of course it is just a camera.
It is also much heavier due to the metal construction but light compared to other cameras available in 1970. It
was part of the Akai VT-100 1.4-inch reel to reel VTR system. It is a black and white camera with a
10-40mm/f1.8 zoom lens, a through the lens optical viewfinder and built in microphone.



1970. Sony AVC-3200 light studio camera with 4 inch viewfinder

Sony AVC-3200 light studio camera Sony Sony AVC-3200 light studio camera

Sony AVC-3200 light studio camera Sony AVC-3200 light studio camera

Sony AVC-3200 light studio camera Sony AVC-3200 light studio camera

Complete camera kit including a Sony camera case, AVC-3200TE base, AVC-3200CE screen/monitor attachment,
TV zoom lens 11.5-90mm, Basic Sony TV lens 16mm, original Sony tripod, original Sony microphone and BNC
to TV lead. The AVC-3200 uses a 2/3" vidicon tube and has a detachable 4" viewfinder.
This is classed as a light studio camera with an excellent zoom lens and is for professional use.



1970. Sony AVC-3420CE camera

Sony AVC-3420CE camera Sony AVC-3420CE camera

Sony AVC-3420CE camera Sony AVC-3420CE camera

This is the camera which first accompanied the Sony VC-3200 reel to reel portable video recorder (Rover II) in 1970.

More notes to follow soon



1972. The Philips V100 camera.

Philips V100 camera Philips V100 camera

Philips V100 camera Philips V100 camera

Philips V100 camera Philips V100 camera

Philips V100 camera Philips V100 camera

This camera would have been used with the Philips n1500 VCR, the first domestic video cammette recorder



1974. The Sony DXC-1600 camera

The Sony DXC-1600 camera The Sony DXC-1600 camera

The Sony DXC-1600 camera The The Sony DXC-1600 camera

This camera was available to accompany the worlds first portable VCR, the VO-3800
The DXC-1600 was a Trinicon tube hand held colour camera. Another first - This was also Sony's first production
hand held colour video camera. Is is a single tube hand held colour camera and the camera head contains
a 1.5 inch black and white CRT viewfinder



1974. Sony dxc-1200 colour studio camera.

Sony DXC-1200 Sony DXC-1200

Sony DXC-1200 Sony DXC-1200

Sony DXC-1200 Sony DXC-1200

Sony DXC-1200 Sony DXC-1200

This large heavy camera is 700mm long. It is a medium studio camera although it is probably about the same size
as a modern full studio camera. Back in 1974 many studio cameras where considerably bigger at the time. It used
a single Sony Trinicon Tube. We have 2 of these cameras in the museum, One with a view finder on the top
and one without. Both are shown above. There is also a dxc-1200 manual in the museum.

Sony DXC 1200 manual Sony DXC 1200 manual

Sony DXC 1200 manual



1974 Panasonic WV-3085 camera.

Panasonic NV-3085 Panasonic NV-3085

Panasonic NV-3085

The camera is in it's original packaging. It is designed to go with the Panasonic NV-3085 portable recorder.



1974. JVC GC-4800U colour video camera with power supply

JVC GC-4800U colour video camera JVC GC-4800U colour video camera

JVC GC-4800U colour video camera JVC GC-4800U colour video camera

JVC GC-4800U colour video camera

This is the colour camera which accompanied the JVC PV-4800U portable 1/2-inch tape colour VTR. This camera
uses two vidicon tubes. The GC-4800 contains a built in 1 and 1/2" viewfinder. Also included is the GA-20U
colour camera adapter. Other sites say this kit is from 1976, however, the correct date is 1974. It was
announced by JVC at "CES" (the Consumer Electronics Show) in 1974 and the show was featured in the 22nd
June 1974 issue of "Billboard" (music recording newspaper) who commented on this colour camera kit. This was
an advanced piece of colour recording kit for 1984. We also have the PV-4800U portable VTR in the museum.



1978. The Sony AVC3450CE camera

Sony AVC-3450 camera Sony AVC-3450 camera

Sony AVC-3450 camera Sony AVC-3450 camera

Sony AVC-3450 camera Sony AVC-3450 camera

The Sony AVC-3450 Portapack camera was Sony's second Rover II camera and had a better vidicon tube compared
to the AVC-3400 camera. It was used with the portable AVC3400 Rover VTR kit and the Betamax SLO-340 kit.



1979. The Ferguson 3V01. Clone of 1st VHS portable kit.

The Ferguson Videostar 3V01 kit The Ferguson Videostar 3V01 kit

The Ferguson 3V01 The Ferguson 3V01

The Ferguson 3V01 The Ferguson 3V01

The Ferguson 3V01 The Ferguson 3V01





1980. The Sony HVC 2000P

Sony HVC 2000P Sony HVC 2000P

Sony HVC 2000P Sony HVC 2000P

Sony HVC 2000P Sony HVC 2000P

This camera has a single 2/3-inch MF Trinitron tube, 300 lines of resolution, fader, sharpness control, sensitivity
booster, remote operation. All complete in camera case. The viewfinder has to be screwed into the front of the camera
and this is time consuming compared to the usual folding method. In it's day it was a good camera, however, within 3
years Sony will introduce the world first camcorder, the BMC100P.
We have two of these Sony HVC 2000P cameras in camera cases in the museum.



1981. Hitachi FP-10 colour light studio camera.

Hitachi FP-10 colour light studio camera Hitachi FP-10 colour light studio camera

Hitachi FP-10 colour light studio camera Hitachi FP-10 colour light studio camera

Hitachi FP-10 colour light studio camera Hitachi FP-10 colour light studio camera

In December 1981 Hitachi introduced this 1 tube colour studio camera.
Horizontal resolution was 450 lines. This was very good at that time and as good as many 3 tube cameras.
The camera weighed 5.5Kg and so it was light enough to be shoulder mounted.
It used a 1-inch tri-electrode Saticon pick-up tube. It could be used as a studio camera with
an optional 5-inch viewfinder. The kit is complete with original carry case and manual.



1981. Hitachi VK-C800E camera

The Hitachi VK-C800E camera Hitachi VK-C800E camera

Hitachi VK-C800E camera The Hitachi VK-C800E camera

Hitachi VK-C800E camera

There is very little information about this camera. Indeed it seems to be quite rare. It is classed as professional
broadcast rather than domestic. It is a Saticon Colour Video Camera VK-C800E from Hitachi Ltd Tokyo



1981. JVC G-71P colour camera.

JVC G-71P camera. JVC G-71P camera.

JVC HR-2200 EK portable VCR and tuner

This colour camera was sometimes packaged with the JVC-HR-2200 portable VCR. This camera is unusual as at this
time cameras would be powered by a camera power supply unit like the AA-P22EG/EK or from the portable VHS
unit. Here in the right hand picture above you can see a rechargeable battery pack on the side of the camera.
Rechargeable batteries attached or inside of camcorders were common but not usually attached to a camera.



1982. The JVC GX-78E colour camera

The JVC GX-78E camera The JVC GX-78E camera

The first VHS portable above was quite heavy and that was because it used a full size VHS tape / tape mechanism.
JVC (Victor Company of Japan) invented the VHSC systems using a smaller tape in 1982. The smaller VHSC tape could
go into a VHS tape adapter and then play in a standard VHS VCR. The HR-C3 VCR came with this GX-78E camera



1982. The JVC KY1900E camera

The JVC KY1900E camera The JVC KY1900E camera

The JVC KY1900E camera The JVC KY1900E camera

The KY-1900E had three saticon tubes which resolved around 400 lines of resolution, price 4700. This bright
colour camera was used by production companies to record corporate events. Like the JVC KY19 below it had
an excellent lens. A very good camera in it's day.



1988. The Panasonic F10 camera.

The Panasonic F10 camera The Panasonic F10 camera

The Panasonic F10 camera The Panasonic F10 camera

The Panasonic F10 camera was called a "component" camera as lots of accessories bolted on and off. It used
the VHS system and would be connected to a full size VHS tape shoulder strap portable video recorder. I had
been shooting video since 1980 but in 1989 I started a video business. This was just at the time SVHS
(higher resolution - 400 lines) started and so the first "camera" was an SVHS camcorder, however I saw many
other people at the time using this F10 camera and separate video recorder. This was one of the very first
cameras which used a CCD chip rather than a tube to capture the picture.
Panasonic replaced this camera in 1993 by the F15 SVHS version. See below.



1993. The Panasonic F15 camera.

The Panasonic F15 camera The Panasonic F15 camera

The Panasonic F15 camera The Panasonic F15 camera

The Panasonic F15 camera The Panasonic F15 camera

The Panasonic F15 camera The Panasonic F15 camera

The Panasonic F15 camera, like the F10 above was also called a "component" camera as lots of accessories
bolted on and off. It used the SVHS system and would be connected to a full size or compact SVHS tape
shoulder strap portable video recorder. When this camera came out I really wanted one. At the time I was
using an SVHS camcorder but this camera with a good portable vcr was capable of amazing pictures. The 10X
optical zoom lens of the F10 had been replaced with a 15X optical zoom lens. When this camera finally came
into the museum I was excited and eager to compare the picture quality with a modern digital camcorder.
It fell a long was short and so was disappointing. TV had moved on.



1993/94. The JVC KY19 dockable camera and
BR9422L dockable recorder.


The JVC KY19 dockable camera recorder. The Panasonic F15 camera

The JVC KY19 dockable camera recorder. The Panasonic F15 camera

The JVC KY19 dockable camera recorder. The Panasonic F15 camera

The JVC KY19 dockable camera recorder. The Panasonic F15 camera

There is a press release about JVC introducing this camera in March 1994, however, parts for their "popular KY 19" camera also
came out in March 94 and it would seem logical it had must have been available a bit longer if it was already popular. Also
the docking S-VHS recorder B-S944E came out in 1993 although this could have docked with other cameras. This was the kit
I always wanted when I was in the video production business but I could not afford it. Eventually I was able to buy this one
second hand. Maybe 1996. As you can see the whole kit came in fantastic condition and this was a fantastic camera. It was
used to film large productions in Theatres. The Fuginon lens, 750 lines of camera resolution, 1/2-inch 3 x CCDs and low light
capability made it the perfect source before the recording stage. From the JVC (archived) web site it says "The KY-19U is top
of its class. New 380,000 pixel, 3CCD, 1/2-inch CCDs, deliver 750 lines of horizontal resolution. High sensitivity
(F/8.0, 2,000 lux) and an S/N ratio of 62dB mean crisp, clear pictures even when the light fades. MSRP: $7,845.00"
Also see the BR-S422U S-VHS dockable recorder MSRP: $3,919.00. With the case and all of the other accessories, the
original price would have been over $12000. This was a heavy kit and so using it was best done on a tripod.



BBC Cameras

Picture from the front cover of Wireless World  July 1946.

Picture from the front cover of Wireless World  September 1948.

Top picture from the front cover of Wireless World July 1946.
Bottom picture from the front cover of Wireless World September 1948.



The Rewind Museum

Making a donation.

The Rewind Museum is a non-profit making endeavour. The web site and the touring exhibitions are run on
a voluntary basis. Donations, not money, just old items you no longer want, are always welcome.
If you have something that you think would be of interest, please contact us with the details.
We can send in a courier to pick them up. (Even an international courier). Thank you.

Please note - The Rewind Museum site has been archived by the British
Library so that future generations can always access the site's content.


To talk to us about making a donation please go to - "making a donation".



Are you interested to read about a 10 year + restoration of a classic vehicle?
If so go to - www.1952chevytruck.com

The 1952 Chevy truck


The 1952 The 1952 Chevy truck web site.



Link to our main site. Satellite TV.

Rewind Museum is sponsored by Vision International. Note. One of our businesses, Vision International (established 1991)
sponsors Rewind Museum and Satellite Museum including financial support for this web site. Vision International
is one of a group of businesses which we have in the field of Satellite TV.

Vu plus satellite receivers 60cm Clear dish

Tune in an extra 10,000 channels? Watch the world? Links to some of the Satellite Superstore pages are below,

Sky Receivers Freesat Receivers All satellite receivers Fixed Dishes Transparent Dishes Motorised systems LNBs
Multiswitches Caravan satellite Satellite finder meters Installation equipment. Catalogue of all satellite products.

Rewind Museum web site is maintained on a non-profit making voluntary basis.
Our main business website is at www.satellitesuperstore.com.
Our main business is satellite TV and we are a specialist satellite company. We
supply satellite goods in the UK and worldwide including fixed and motorised satellite
systems, multiswitches, instrumentation, accessories and installation equipment.




Return to our website introduction page. Read about the aims of our museum.

Web site copyright © 2018 Vision International. All rights reserved.
For all questions & comments about this site's content contact Dave at Rewind Museum.